Stop and Search: legal certainty and dodgy consultation outcomes, two judgements of broader note

Last week Justice Treacy delivered judgements in two judicial reviews relating to the use of emergency-type stop and search powers under the Justice and Security (Northern Ireland) Act 2007, which will be of broader interest to other policy areas too. The first judgement, related to the legal certainty test under human rights law, i.e. whether…Continue reading Stop and Search: legal certainty and dodgy consultation outcomes, two judgements of broader note

UK arrest of Moazzam Begg, ex Guantanamo Bay detainee – Belfast event

I am concerned to hear of the arrest of Moazzam Begg, former Guantanamo Bay detainee. Here is an article that I wrote for Amnesty International’s blog, “Belfast and Beyond”, when Moazzam Begg spoke about his experiences alongside Guantanamo former military guard at St Mary’s University College in Belfast in 2009. I haven’t followed the work…Continue reading UK arrest of Moazzam Begg, ex Guantanamo Bay detainee – Belfast event

The Haass / O’Sullivan Proposed Agreement on parades and flags: analysis from a human rights perspective

CAJ made two submissions to the Haass process. The first (S419) related to advocating a single mechanism to deal with the legacy of the conflict. The other sets of issues dealt with by the Panel of Parties, including “Flags, symbols, emblems and related matters” and dealing with parades and protests, were dealt with in a…Continue reading The Haass / O’Sullivan Proposed Agreement on parades and flags: analysis from a human rights perspective

Why “Shoot to Kill” won’t go away

Rights NI is delighted to welcome this guest post from  Professor Fionnuala Ni Aoláin. Professor Ní Aoláin is concurrently Associate Director  at the University of Ulster’s Transitional Justice Institute in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and the Dorsey & Whitney Chair in Law at the University of Minnesota Law School. She is co-founder and associate director of the Transitional…Continue reading Why “Shoot to Kill” won’t go away

CONFERENCE: Challenging the Oppression of Lawyers in Times of Conflict

  On Wednesday 13 November 2013 the Human Rights Centre, School of Law at Queen’s University Belfast are hosting a one day conference entitled ‘Challenging the Oppression of Lawyers in Times of Conflict’. It is open to anyone interested in conflict studies, politics, international relations, human rights, international law, justice and transitional justice.   SPEAKERS…Continue reading CONFERENCE: Challenging the Oppression of Lawyers in Times of Conflict

(More) UK intervention in Syria: some additional questions

On the face of it last week was a good week for scrutinising power in that questions from the UK Parliament did ultimately derail the stated desire of the UK government to partake in an imminent attack on Syria (in effect a further intervention given the existing levels of UK support for the rebels). Among those who …Continue reading (More) UK intervention in Syria: some additional questions

Sectarian/racist expression and restricting parades to protect the rights of others: implications of Vona v Hungary

On 9 July 2013 the European Court of Human Rights issued its judgment in the case of Vona v Hungary relating to a supremacist organisation engaged in military-style assemblies. The authorities had ultimately dissolved the organisation following its attempt, blocked by police, to march through a street inhabited by Roma families. In the context of protecting…Continue reading Sectarian/racist expression and restricting parades to protect the rights of others: implications of Vona v Hungary

What does “National Security” actually mean?

The Committee on the Administration of Justice (CAJ) published a report in late 2012 entitled “The Policing You Don’t See”. It highlighted the ‘parallel justice system’ currently operating in Northern Ireland. This consists of a police force accountable to local mechanisms and another “force outside a force” responsible for national security issues, operating from within…Continue reading What does “National Security” actually mean?