Symbolic Reparation: Memorialisation and symbolic justice – Thoughts on the impending Mother and Baby Homes & Magdalen Laundries Inquiry in Northern Ireland Adrienne Reilly, part-time Doctoral student in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Strathclyde, Scotland

This blog post by Adrienne Reilly[1] introduces in brief the complex area of symbolic reparation, namely memorialisation and memorial practice that she is currently investigating as part of her doctoral research. On March 29th 2021, a Panel of Experts[2] spoke at an online event organised by Amnesty International Northern Ireland on Learning the Lessons: Co-Designing…Continue reading Symbolic Reparation: Memorialisation and symbolic justice – Thoughts on the impending Mother and Baby Homes & Magdalen Laundries Inquiry in Northern Ireland Adrienne Reilly, part-time Doctoral student in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Strathclyde, Scotland

Immunity for State Forces in Latin America and Northern Ireland: A Comparative Perspective By Gemma Canham, Graduate in Politics and Spanish, Queen's University Belfast

Introduction Following the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, a “piecemeal” method of dealing with the past emerged due to that agreement’s lack of an overarching method to confront the legacy of the Troubles.[1] Due to this lack of continuity, the Stormont House Agreement (2014) provided for four measures to fill this gap: (1) an Implementation…Continue reading Immunity for State Forces in Latin America and Northern Ireland: A Comparative Perspective By Gemma Canham, Graduate in Politics and Spanish, Queen’s University Belfast

Reverse burdens of proof and Unexplained Wealth Orders Sean Molloy, Lecturer in Law, Northumbria University

Naomi Long- the Minister for Justice- has recently reaffirmed her intention to introduce Unexplained Wealth Orders (UWO) in Northern Ireland (NI). The Independent Reporting Commission (IRC) called for the move last November in a report which said the additional powers would help law enforcement tackle paramilitarism and organised crime. This would seem, to most, a…Continue reading Reverse burdens of proof and Unexplained Wealth Orders Sean Molloy, Lecturer in Law, Northumbria University

One rule for the military, another for the rest? Special courts and hiding accountability in Colombia Daniela Castillo, Volunteer for CAJ and Master’s Student at TJI

Since the 2014 Stormont House Agreement, there have been a number of alternative proposals to deal with the legacy of the Northern Ireland conflict recently examined in a report by the CAJ-QUB Model Bill Team. Many of these came from groupings seeking various forms of amnesty or ‘statutes of limitations’ for the security forces, specifically…Continue reading One rule for the military, another for the rest? Special courts and hiding accountability in Colombia Daniela Castillo, Volunteer for CAJ and Master’s Student at TJI

A re-tread of tired approaches: A review of ‘Sectarianism in Northern Ireland: A Review’ Guest post by Brian Gormally, Director, CAJ

“The attention paid to ‘sectarianism’ in this paper, is not intended to be judgemental or pejorative, but to describe a common predicament: we were raised in a society where sectarianism was ‘built in’ to normality.” That single sentence taken from page 8 of Sectarianism in Northern Ireland: A Review, published in early May, encapsulates the…Continue reading A re-tread of tired approaches: A review of ‘Sectarianism in Northern Ireland: A Review’ Guest post by Brian Gormally, Director, CAJ

Addressing the legacy of Northern Ireland’s past Guest post by Chief Commissioner Les Allamby, Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (NIHRC)

One of the realities of the legacy of the past and moving forward the institutions created in the Stormont House Agreement is that they are the only game in town. There is no plan ‘B’ and no realistic prospect of any alternative arriving in the foreseeable future. The Commission welcomes the draft consultation and legislation…Continue reading Addressing the legacy of Northern Ireland’s past Guest post by Chief Commissioner Les Allamby, Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (NIHRC)

RUC Walker Report: The Wall of Silence Loses Another Brick Guest post by Brian Gormally, CAJ

On 16 January 1980, the then Chief Constable of the RUC commissioned a report on the interchange of intelligence between Special Branch (SB) and the Criminal Investigation Department (CID) and on the staffing and organisation of various other RUC units. This was written by one Patrick J. Walker, then a senior officer in the Belfast…Continue reading RUC Walker Report: The Wall of Silence Loses Another Brick Guest post by Brian Gormally, CAJ